Menu
Stoke Newington Chambers

Archive for the ‘Criminal law’ Category

Is this Bust Card worth the paper it’s written on?

Posted on: April 22nd, 2019 | in Criminal law, Direct Access Barristers, DIY Law, Police, Public law
Is this Bust Card worth the paper it's written on?

You’re at the climate change march and the atmosphere’s getting a little fresh. Someone’s shoved a police officer and now the cops are rounding up people in the immediate area. You’ve done nothing wrong, but PC Joe is talking to you. What do you do if PC Joe asks for your name and address? Say… { Read More }

Should I go No Comment at my police interview?

Should I go No Comment at my police interview?

Sometimes people ask me if they should “go no comment” in their police interviews. The big problem with this question is that they’re trying to figure it out for themselves, rather than asking asking the police station rep who has seen the police evidence. And the reason some ask this question is because they just… { Read More }

Should I accept a simple police caution?

Posted on: April 15th, 2019 | in Criminal law, DIY Law, Police, Private client criminal defence
Should I accept a simple police caution?

Most people at the police station want to get the experience over with as soon as possible. They turn down the free legal advice and accept simple police cautions because they’re scared of being charged with a crime. Some people think that a simple caution is just a formal warning that will put whatever’s happened… { Read More }

HMOs, Leaseholders & Estate Agents at Magistrates Courts

I’ve been busy advising landlords on HMO liability over the past month. Some were looking for “quick” advice. While I am known for turning round work fast – “quick” is another matter. “Quick” implies, “off the top of your head, what’s the answer?” Whether a person has HMO liability will depend on the facts of… { Read More }

Papers, please (Magistrates Court Style)

Papers, please (Krakow, 1941)

Defendants in court now must declare their nationality. If a Defendant is a citizen of more than one country, s/he must declare all citizenships held. As of 13 November 2017, “A person commits an offence if, without reasonable excuse, that person fails to comply with such a requirement, whether by providing false or incomplete information… { Read More }

In the frame for Assault Obstruct PC? Read this.

Posted on: December 17th, 2017 | in Advocacy, Criminal law, Direct Access Barristers, DIY Law
In the frame for Assault Obstruct PC? Read this.

I represented a family who were all charged with Assault / Obstruct PC. After engaging in deep legal research and repeated viewing of the police officers’ body worn camera footage – as well as CCTV from the local council, I was able to effectively cross-examine the officers – taking each of their versions apart, brick… { Read More }

Speeding Success: the 75 in a 40 hopeless case

Speeding Success: the 75 in a 40 hopeless case

Speeding down the North Cray Road, and having clocked somebody driving 75 mph in a 40 zone, the traffic officer was sure this one would stick. But I found a technical defence and my client walked away from the Bexley Magistrates Court with his clean licence intact. His father said: “Kristin was great today and… { Read More }

My Theft Mindmap

Posted on: May 8th, 2017 | in Criminal law, Get qualified

Students get a bit overwhelmed at this time of year – and panic about how they are going to learn – and memorise lots of law. Because I’m more of a “show me” type of learner, I make mind maps. Here’s a partial theft mind map for you to complete.